MAKING AFRICA’S VOICE MATTER IN THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL: BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN AMBITION AND REALITY IN THE ROLE OF THE AFRICAN THREE MEMBERS OF THE UNSC

Special Reports

24 | March, 2021

Following its 983rd session held on 4 March 2021, the African Union (AU) Peace and Security Council (PSC) adopted a decision on the unified role of the African three elected members (A3) of the United Nations (UN) Security Council (UNSC). The content of the decision identified both existing best practices for consolidation and new proposals on the workings of the A3 and the coordination with the PSC. Manifesting a renewed interest of the PSC for enhanced role of the A3, the outcome of the 983rd session of the PSC offers the basis for examining the ways of bridging the gap between the potential of the role of the A3 and the experience thus far in respect of representing Africa’s voice through collective action in the UNSC

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10 Years Review of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda of the AU Peace and Security Council

Special Reports

26 | August, 2020

The year 2020 is a milestone for the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda. In addition to the commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) Resolution 1325, this year also marks the 10th anniversary of the African Union (AU) Peace and Security Council (PSC) decision making women, peace and security a standing thematic agenda of the PSC. 1 Moreover, the year also marks the 10th anniversary of the Decade for African Women (2010-2020), which was launched on 15 October 2010 in Nairobi and subsequently endorsed by the 16th Ordinary Session of the Union in 2011.

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Impact of COVID-19 on Multilateral Cooperation and Implications for Peace and Security in Africa

Special Reports

18 | June, 2020

On 27 May, the African Union (AU) Peace and Security Council (PSC) held a session on the impact of the novel coronavirus COVID19 on Living Together in Peace. The theme of the session offered useful lens for discussing the impact of COVID19 on multilateral cooperation and its implications for peace and security in Africa. In this special research report, we present an analysis of the impact of COVID19 on multilateralism and its implications for Africa based on the presentation that Amani Africa delivered to the PSC during its 928th session on 27 May.

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New Peace and Security Council Working Methods During the COVID-19 Suspension of Physical Meetings

Special Reports

28 | April, 2020

The measures required for containing the new global pandemic known as the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID19) require, among others, avoiding physical contact and observing social distancing. These measures necessitate the freezing of activities that bring together a group of people in one place. The result of this is that business meetings, political or religious gatherings are banned, schools are temporarily closed, and in some cases work stopped.

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The Internal Institutional Setup and Working Processes Shaping the Relationship between the AUPSC and the UNSC

Special Reports

28 | December, 2019

The establishment of the Peace and Security Council (PSC) under the 2002 Protocol to the AU Constitutive Act on the Establishment of the PSC 1 (PSC Protocol) and its launch in 2004 2 has transformed the peace and security landscape of the continent. Most notably, among others, it has changed the role of international engagement in the maintenance of peace and security in Africa. The PSC Protocol, in defining the principles governing the maintenance of peace and security in Africa, attributing leading role to the PSC and defining how the PSC interfaces with international actors, sets the expectations of the continent on the parameters of international action, including through the United Nations (UN), on peace and security in Africa.

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Update on The Reform of the AU: Review of the 11th Extraordinary Summit of the AU

Special Reports

22 | November, 2018

The African Union (AU) held a record number of 4 summits in 2018. The last and most recent of these was the 11th extraordinary summit held on 17-18 November here in Addis Abeba, Ethiopia.

This latest summit of the AU attracted the participation of at least 17 heads of state and government of AU member states. Surely compared to the attendance of AU heads of state and government for the China-Africa summit in Beijing, this is lamentable. Yet, it is considered to be not too bad for an extraordinary summit.

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Financing Peace and Security in Africa: Breakthrough in Increased African Ownership?

Special Reports

July, 2017

The report by President Paul Kagame regarding the AU reform process is a major agenda item during the 29th AU summit to be held on 3‐4 July 2017 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The financing of the AU including peace and security is at the heart of the reform agenda. An aspect of the financing of the Union attracting interest is the initiative on securing predictable and sustainable financing for peace in Africa, led by former African Development Bank President Dr Donald Kaberuka.

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Seizing Africa’s New Moment for the Reform of the African Union

Special Reports

July, 2017

In his report, ‘The Imperative to Strengthen our Union: Proposed Recommendations for the Institutional Reform of the African Union’, President Paul Kagame of Rwanda observed that ‘it has always been Africa’s moment’. He went on to state that the ‘question at any given time is whether we choose to be present and develop the institutional capacity … to seize the available advantages.’ In adopting the report and its recommendations at the 28th AU Summit in January 2017, the African Union (AU) Assembly presented itself a new moment for the reform of the AU. As leaders of African States descend on Addis Ababa for 29th AU Summit to discuss the reform of the AU, once again the question is whether member states would seize this new moment and ensure the implementation of the reform agenda.

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The reform of the AU: towards the Peace and Security Council ‘we want’

Special Reports

Date | 06 August, 2018

The point of departure for the reform of the Peace and Security Council (PSC) is President Paul Kagame’s report on the reform of the AU.1 The report lamented that ‘[d]espite its strong legal framework and enhanced powers and functions, the quality of the Peace and Security (Council)’s decision-making, engagement, and impact do not meet the ambition envisaged in the PSC Protocol.’ 2 Underscoring that ‘thorough reform’ of the PSC was required, the report recommended ‘(a) reviewing the PSC’s membership, in line with Article 5(2) of the PSC Protocol, (b) strengthening the PSC’s working methods, and (c) strengthening the PSC’s role in prevention and crisis management.

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